Love and Companionship for Baby Boomers

June 24, 2012 by  
Filed under Personal Development

LOVE & COMPANIONSHIP FOR BABY BOOMERS
By Michael Thomas Masters

romantic-heart
Baby Boomers can experience romantic love and companionship. Persons over age forty-five express as much romantic passion as those in their twenties. We can surely fall in love at any age, in our 50s, 60s and even 80s and 90s. This is true for all mature adults, gay, straight, bi-sexual or transgender. In fact, we boomers (and older folks) are becoming the oomph generation!

More and more Baby Boomers are entering the dating world to find companionship and to have someone to communicate with, whether or not romance (and more) follows.

People are living longer and healthier lives as a direct result of looking for love and/or companionship later in life, as well as keeping positive and healthy attitudes. Countless Boomers (and older) are far more active than previous elder generations.

Even in our media and marketing worlds, mature romance comes in a rainbow of diversity, as is evident in countless films, plays, TV programs, TV commercials and printed materials.

For instance, consider the touching, amusing, insightful and offbeat comedy-romance film, HAROLD & MAUDE. At a funeral, a depressed, twenty-year old, Harold (Burt Cort) befriends Maude (the effervescent Ruth Gordon), a seventies plus woman who has a zest for life. Maude and Harold spend much time together, even falling in love, during which time she exposes Harold to the wonders and possibilities of life.
harold-maude
On the small screen, the classic television series THE GOLDEN GIRLS remains a tribute to mature, knowledgeable and lively people, with the series main characters mostly over fifty and full of oomph!

In the past, mature or prime time adults (or seniors, if you prefer) chose more traditional venues, such as cruise ships, bowling clubs, placing personal ads and church gatherings in seeking companionship and/or romantic partners.

With the tagline, “this is what love feels like,” in the film BEGINNERS, a seventy-five years young gay man (Christopher Plummer) meets his younger lover Andy (Goran Visnjc) through social circles, which worked for this happy and loving couple.

Even though these tried and true in-person dating settings are still suitable and work for many single Boomers, on-line Internet dating and surfing has become tremendously popular, saving time, cash and even recurrent travel miles. After all, prime-time age people are far more computer literate than we often give ourselves credit.

Considering the fact that in 2012 half of all people in America over fifty are single, it makes sense that dating sites for those in their golden years are popping up worldwide. Furthermore, in our neighboring country of Canada, where 42% of the entire population is dating online, over the age of forty-five dating has become very acceptable.

Additionally, like plenty of folks under age fifty, many prime-time adults do not feel comfortable hitting the singles bars and other social gathering scenes.

At the time of meeting someone through online dating, you can get to know them better by sharing more information during initial e-mails; than you would with someone, you just start dating in-person. This is because you often spend time sending e-mail (or snail mail) messages back and forth, talking on the telephone and possibly even sharing personal photos or videos.

When you do meet for the first time, taking security precautions are essential, such as meeting in a public place, letting people know where you are going and when you will be back, and taking your cell phone with you. Such precautions are wise to follow even for non-Internet generated first dates.

Remember that human companionship and love can occur when and where we least expect it. In addition to increasing changes of meeting someone, being involved in social activities, gatherings and clubs often places us in environments with other single and interesting Baby Boomers also in search of relationships and/or love.

While further examining media Baby Boomer theme examples, consider the film LAST CHANCE HARRY in which a lonely and single man (Dustin Hoffman) in his 60s, while attending his daughter’s wedding, finds his romantic spirits lifted (and his life changed) by a new female friend (Emma Thompson) in her 50s.
love-birds
Sound a little too romantic? Hey, sometimes life can be that way. Moreover, love happens to folks of all ages!

If you consider on-line dating as an option, checkout these Baby Boomer (and plus) companionship and dating websites, or surf the Internet on your own for other dating sites and social meeting alternatives.

BabyBoomerPeopleMeet.com

Babyboomer-dating.com

SeniorFriendFinder.com

gay.com

chemistry.com (gay and lesbian)

Singleparentsmingle.com

Christiancafe.com

ChristianMingle.com

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Michael Thomas Masters can be reached at filmguy552003@yahoo.com

How to Live to 100

March 23, 2011 by  
Filed under health

woman-long
This is a kind of follow-up blogpost to The Longevity Quiz (what can I say. I just recently turned fifty and have been thinking about this subject)

Today I ran across an article from Health magazine.

Apparently those born after the year 2000 are more likely than ever to live to 100, according to research from Denmark. Good news for the kids, but what about us grown-ups?

Genetics do play a big factor in how long you live (thank you grandparents), but only somewhere between 20% and 50%, depending on the experts you ask. That still leaves over 50% up to YOU!

Walter Bortz II, MD, a clinical associate professor of medicine at Stanford, suggests how you can improve your odds of a long and happy life.
dna-tree
We can call this The Walter Bortz II, MD, Secrets to a Long Life:

Bulk up on fruits and veggies, +5 years (plant based whole foods diets reduce disease)

Exercise five days a week, +2 to +4 years (move and elevate your heart rate for a half-hour a day, minimum)

Reduce stress, up to +6 years (from meditation to music to movement to art therapy. Find something that work for you.

Get a hobby, +2 years (provides a sense of accomplishment.)

Floss, +6.4 years (removing harmful bacteria reduces stroke and heart attack risks.)

Vacation, +1 to +2 years (leisure is a great stress reliever!)

Sleep seven to eight hours nightly, +2 years (sleep assists cell repair.)

Have sex, +3 to +5 years (releases feel good hormones and burns about 200 calories, too!)

Thought you would like to know!

Revealing German Study on Runners and Lifestyle

December 22, 2010 by  
Filed under health

run-good
A German study recently published in the latest issue of Deutsches Arzteblatt International reveals a link between lifestyle and exercise.

Sports scientists have revealed that impairments to health and physical performance are not primarily a result of aging but of bad lifestyle habits and lack of exercise.

Dieter Leyk and his team analyzed the stamina of more than 600, 000 marathon and half marathon runners and asked them about their lifestyle habits and their health.

Marathon running is particularly suitable for studying because participants have to put in sufficient training hours for the competition, and the athletes accommodate this into their day accordingly.
un-habits
The scientists found that unfavorable characteristics such as obesity, smoking, and lack of physical activity were rare in runners, and reductions in physical performance were more likely to be the result of biological aging processes.

These reductions make their presence felt only after the 54th year of life and are but slight. More than 25 per cent of 50- to 69-year-olds had taken up running only in the preceding 5 years and participated in a marathon nonetheless. You can see this connection highlighted in the short video on oomphtv.com about the 94 year old runner Jack Kirk-The Dipsea Demon.
exercise-foot
Something to think about when making your New Year’s resolution.

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Love is a Powerful Painkiller

December 20, 2010 by  
Filed under health

love-sign
Love is a powerful painkiller, study finds. I have always thought this, but now we have a study to examine.

Researchers say just a photo of one’s beloved activates the brain’s reward centers something like a drug might. Learning how to harness this could help relieve pain without drug induced side effects, scientists suggest.

The study, published online in the journal PLoS ONE, sprang from a meeting of minds between Arthur Aron of State University of New York at Stony Brook, a longtime researcher of the science of love, and Dr. Sean Mackey, a pain scientist at Stanford University. The two shared a hotel room while attending a neuroscience conference a few years back. Their epiphany came one evening over drinks.

”I’d had a couple glasses of Zinfandel and was chatting about pain and the brain systems involved and he was chatting about love and the brain systems involved,” Mackey said. “And we realized, you know, they could be influencing each other.”

They knew that a few earlier studies had suggested that love relieved pain, but they wanted to go further and find out just what was happening in the brain.

love-beach
They put out a call on the Stanford campus for people who were in the first nine months of a relationship and still in the throes of romantic passion.

”It was clearly the easiest study we’ve ever recruited for  within hours we had these students banging on our doors saying, ‘We’re in love! We’re in love! Study us,’ “Mackey said.



Jarred Younger, then a Stanford graduate student, and the team tested 15 subjects. All were asked to bring in six photos: three of their beloved and three of a comparably attractive person they knew. The researchers heated the palms of the subjects’ left hands to a point that caused either a moderate or high degree of pain, at which point the subjects looked at a photo, either of their beloved or the acquaintance.

In a third round of experiments, the researchers tested the effects of mere distraction, which is known to reduce pain, by having the subjects perform mental tasks (such as thinking of all sports that didn’t involve a ball) while their palms were heated.

The photo of the beloved and mental distraction appeared to reduce pain by about the same amount: 36% to 45% for moderate pain, and 12% to 13% for high pain. (The photo of the peer had no effect.) But when the scientists redid the experiment while scanning subjects’ brains with a functional MRI, they saw that the photo and the mental distraction task activated very different parts of the brain.

 The distraction task engaged the higher, thinking parts of the brain. A photo of the beloved, on the other hand, engaged the more primitive, “reptilian” regions reward centers related to urges and cravings that are also implicated in addictions. 

Learning how to harness the power of a loved one could help relieve pain without drug-induced side effects  or perhaps help people quit smoking, the scientists suggested.

”Will I be going back to my patients and prescribing one passionate love affair every six months? I don’t know if I’m going there,” Mackey said. “But it tells us there’s a lot more to the experience of pain than just the injury.”
love-rain
Bruce Naliboff, co-director of the UCLA Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women’s Health, said that the next step could be to separate out how much, if any, of the pain reduction was related to sexual desire.

”It’d be interesting to do an experiment with not just an acquaintance, but someone you feel close to just not a sexual attraction,” said Naliboff, who was not involved in the study.

 That might include budding platonic relationships.

Like I said, I have always thought this, but now there is a study to examine. It would be interesting to see the results from a study of platonic relationships. oomphtv will certainly publish the results of their next study.

Walking can Help Memory and Cognitive Function

October 22, 2010 by  
Filed under health

my-walk
I just read this recent report that came out last week and it makes me want to put a walk/hike together for oomphTV.

Studies suggest that even short walks or hikes can make a big difference in your overall health. Walking can even help maintain memory and cognitive function for years, a study finds.



The research, published online Wednesday in the journal Neurology, is based on a study of 299 men and women, average age 78, who were followed for nine years. The study participants were asked about their physical activity, which was calculated as number of blocks walked per week (walking was the most common exercise). Study subjects walked from zero to 300 blocks over a one-week period. High-resolution brain scans were done on the participants nine years after the beginning of the study.



The more the participants walked at the beginning of the study, the greater their brain volume nine years later. This was still the case after researchers controlled for a number of factors, including age, gender, body mass index and education.

 How many blocks of walking per week did it take to see improvement? The magic number was 72, or about six to nine miles. Walking more than that didn’t further improve gray-matter volume.

 Although all participants were deemed cognitively normal at the beginning of the study, 40% developed cognitive impairment or dementia four years in.

my-brain
However, those who walked the most reduced their risk of acquiring memory loss by half. 

Lead author Kirk Erickson of the University of Pittsburgh said in a news release, “If regular exercise in midlife could improve brain health and improve thinking and memory in later life, it would be one more reason to make regular exercise in people of all ages a public health imperative.”


Those of you that are interested in putting together a hike in the Los Angeles area, perhaps in Griffith Park, please contact me david@oomphtv.com. If you don’t live in the Los Angeles area, perhaps you can contact some of your friends/neighbors and organize your own walk/hike.

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